Marián Komáček
stamps
The Orava, an unpredictable river, brought benefits as well as a lot of misery to the residents who, in the past, lived near the confluence of the rivers Biela and Čierna Orava. This is also proven by archived records. The most terrible flood, also referred to as “Palackého veľká voda” (Palacky’s Great Flood), took place in 1813. Repeated flooding sparked the first ideas and designs on how to reduce the power of the Biela and Čierna Orava as early as 1830 and later in 1842, 1870, 1918, 1923 and 1933, each time after flooding. Archived records show that the first measurements and research activities took place as early as 1871. The studies considered building different types of dams with a reservoir of up to 850 million m3. As many as 9 alternative design concepts for the dam, dating from the beginning of the 20th century, were preserved in the archives of the state administration authority in Ústie nad Oravou. Several of them were created during the construction of the dam (after 1941). Doubts regarding the choice of design began to appear once the execution of the concrete gravity dam began. The Orava Dam was, at that time, the first large hydro-technical structure in Czechoslovakia to be built under such difficult geological conditions. Issues with geotechnical stability, aggressive groundwater and high compressibility of the rock complicated the already difficult construction conditions. The Orava Dam had become not only a national problem, but a problem of a European magnitude. Experts from Switzerland, Germany and Poland were invited to the construction site. Eventually, these problems were solved with an original concept for the Orava Dam, as it is known today. It is a concrete gravity dam, relieved, with horizontal reinforcement blocks covered by a layer of clay insulation with a grout curtain at the sub-base (Dr. Jiroušek et. al., 1949). In the field of dam engineering, the Orava Dam represents a unique solution which guarantees not only safety from flooding, but is also a rare technical innovation of European significance.
The Orava, an unpredictable river, brought benefits as well as a lot of misery to the residents who, in the past, lived near the confluence of the rivers Biela and Čierna Orava. This is also proven by archived records. The most terrible flood, also referred to as “Palackého veľká voda” (Palacky’s Great Flood), took place in 1813. Repeated flooding sparked the first ideas and designs on how to reduce the power of the Biela and Čierna Orava as early as 1830 and later in 1842, 1870, 1918, 1923 and 1933, each time after flooding. Archived records show that the first measurements and research activities took place as early as 1871. The studies considered building different types of dams with a reservoir of up to 850 million m3. As many as 9 alternative design concepts for the dam, dating from the beginning of the 20th century, were preserved in the archives of the state administration authority in Ústie nad Oravou. Several of them were created during the construction of the dam (after 1941). Doubts regarding the choice of design began to appear once the execution of the concrete gravity dam began. The Orava Dam was, at that time, the first large hydro-technical structure in Czechoslovakia to be built under such difficult geological conditions. Issues with geotechnical stability, aggressive groundwater and high compressibility of the rock complicated the already difficult construction conditions. The Orava Dam had become not only a national problem, but a problem of a European magnitude. Experts from Switzerland, Germany and Poland were invited to the construction site. Eventually, these problems were solved with an original concept for the Orava Dam, as it is known today. It is a concrete gravity dam, relieved, with horizontal reinforcement blocks covered by a layer of clay insulation with a grout curtain at the sub-base (Dr. Jiroušek et. al., 1949). In the field of dam engineering, the Orava Dam represents a unique solution which guarantees not only safety from flooding, but is also a rare technical innovation of European significance.
The Orava, an unpredictable river, brought benefits as well as a lot of misery to the residents who, in the past, lived near the confluence of the rivers Biela and Čierna Orava. This is also proven by archived records. The most terrible flood, also referred to as “Palackého veľká voda” (Palacky’s Great Flood), took place in 1813. Repeated flooding sparked the first ideas and designs on how to reduce the power of the Biela and Čierna Orava as early as 1830 and later in 1842, 1870, 1918, 1923 and 1933, each time after flooding. Archived records show that the first measurements and research activities took place as early as 1871. The studies considered building different types of dams with a reservoir of up to 850 million m3. As many as 9 alternative design concepts for the dam, dating from the beginning of the 20th century, were preserved in the archives of the state administration authority in Ústie nad Oravou. Several of them were created during the construction of the dam (after 1941). Doubts regarding the choice of design began to appear once the execution of the concrete gravity dam began. The Orava Dam was, at that time, the first large hydro-technical structure in Czechoslovakia to be built under such difficult geological conditions. Issues with geotechnical stability, aggressive groundwater and high compressibility of the rock complicated the already difficult construction conditions. The Orava Dam had become not only a national problem, but a problem of a European magnitude. Experts from Switzerland, Germany and Poland were invited to the construction site. Eventually, these problems were solved with an original concept for the Orava Dam, as it is known today. It is a concrete gravity dam, relieved, with horizontal reinforcement blocks covered by a layer of clay insulation with a grout curtain at the sub-base (Dr. Jiroušek et. al., 1949). In the field of dam engineering, the Orava Dam represents a unique solution which guarantees not only safety from flooding, but is also a rare technical innovation of European significance.
The Orava, an unpredictable river, brought benefits as well as a lot of misery to the residents who, in the past, lived near the confluence of the rivers Biela and Čierna Orava. This is also proven by archived records. The most terrible flood, also referred to as “Palackého veľká voda” (Palacky’s Great Flood), took place in 1813. Repeated flooding sparked the first ideas and designs on how to reduce the power of the Biela and Čierna Orava as early as 1830 and later in 1842, 1870, 1918, 1923 and 1933, each time after flooding. Archived records show that the first measurements and research activities took place as early as 1871. The studies considered building different types of dams with a reservoir of up to 850 million m3. As many as 9 alternative design concepts for the dam, dating from the beginning of the 20th century, were preserved in the archives of the state administration authority in Ústie nad Oravou. Several of them were created during the construction of the dam (after 1941). Doubts regarding the choice of design began to appear once the execution of the concrete gravity dam began. The Orava Dam was, at that time, the first large hydro-technical structure in Czechoslovakia to be built under such difficult geological conditions. Issues with geotechnical stability, aggressive groundwater and high compressibility of the rock complicated the already difficult construction conditions. The Orava Dam had become not only a national problem, but a problem of a European magnitude. Experts from Switzerland, Germany and Poland were invited to the construction site. Eventually, these problems were solved with an original concept for the Orava Dam, as it is known today. It is a concrete gravity dam, relieved, with horizontal reinforcement blocks covered by a layer of clay insulation with a grout curtain at the sub-base (Dr. Jiroušek et. al., 1949). In the field of dam engineering, the Orava Dam represents a unique solution which guarantees not only safety from flooding, but is also a rare technical innovation of European significance.
The Orava, an unpredictable river, brought benefits as well as a lot of misery to the residents who, in the past, lived near the confluence of the rivers Biela and Čierna Orava. This is also proven by archived records. The most terrible flood, also referred to as “Palackého veľká voda” (Palacky’s Great Flood), took place in 1813. Repeated flooding sparked the first ideas and designs on how to reduce the power of the Biela and Čierna Orava as early as 1830 and later in 1842, 1870, 1918, 1923 and 1933, each time after flooding. Archived records show that the first measurements and research activities took place as early as 1871. The studies considered building different types of dams with a reservoir of up to 850 million m3. As many as 9 alternative design concepts for the dam, dating from the beginning of the 20th century, were preserved in the archives of the state administration authority in Ústie nad Oravou. Several of them were created during the construction of the dam (after 1941). Doubts regarding the choice of design began to appear once the execution of the concrete gravity dam began. The Orava Dam was, at that time, the first large hydro-technical structure in Czechoslovakia to be built under such difficult geological conditions. Issues with geotechnical stability, aggressive groundwater and high compressibility of the rock complicated the already difficult construction conditions. The Orava Dam had become not only a national problem, but a problem of a European magnitude. Experts from Switzerland, Germany and Poland were invited to the construction site. Eventually, these problems were solved with an original concept for the Orava Dam, as it is known today. It is a concrete gravity dam, relieved, with horizontal reinforcement blocks covered by a layer of clay insulation with a grout curtain at the sub-base (Dr. Jiroušek et. al., 1949). In the field of dam engineering, the Orava Dam represents a unique solution which guarantees not only safety from flooding, but is also a rare technical innovation of European significance.
The Power Plant in Piešťany was built in 1906 as a municipal power plant and remained in operation until 1945. The plant was equipped with three 90-horsepower diesel engines, two 51 kW generators and one 64 kW generator. The generators were designed to produce 50 Hz AC and 3 000 Volts of power. Due to its historic and architectural importance, the power plant in Piešťany was declared an immovable cultural heritage monument in 1995 and has been registered in the Central List of Cultural Monuments. The Piešťany power plant is currently offering interactive exhibitions and workshops in the fields of ecology, energy and natural sciences for both elementary and high school students. Additionally, the Power Plant offers a wealth of programmes promoting science to the public, plus concerts, art exhibitions, seminars, training activities and guided tours. For more information, please visit www.elektrarnapiestany.sk.
The Power Plant in Piešťany was built in 1906 as a municipal power plant and remained in operation until 1945. The plant was equipped with three 90-horsepower diesel engines, two 51 kW generators and one 64 kW generator. The generators were designed to produce 50 Hz AC and 3 000 Volts of power. Due to its historic and architectural importance, the power plant in Piešťany was declared an immovable cultural heritage monument in 1995 and has been registered in the Central List of Cultural Monuments. The Piešťany power plant is currently offering interactive exhibitions and workshops in the fields of ecology, energy and natural sciences for both elementary and high school students. Additionally, the Power Plant offers a wealth of programmes promoting science to the public, plus concerts, art exhibitions, seminars, training activities and guided tours. For more information, please visit www.elektrarnapiestany.sk.
The Traction engine Umrath is part of the collection in the Slovak Agricultural Museum and was constructed in Prague in 1894. The weight of the traction engine is 3.5tonnes. The steam pressure is 7atmospheres which provides power to the drive wheels of 6 to 9hp, with a rotation speed of160rpm. For 8 hours of operation the coal consumption is approximately 200 kg and the water consumption 400 litres. We received information that the traction engine was still in existence, located above the village of Breznička from Ing. Čavoj in July 1985. On November 27, 1985 it was transported to the museum. After some research it was established that the Traction engine originally belonged to the “Lučenecký vlnársky závod v Opatovej pri Lučenci” – a wool processing company which was founded in 1868. Initially the Traction engine was used to drive pumps, but after World War I it was moved to the village of Breznička, where it was used to drive threshing machines and shredders. Given that it was a very rare traction engine, it awakened a tremendous desire in the museum staff to restore it. This was very strongly supported by: Dr. Križan, Mr. Boroth and his sons, Mr. Pilný, Mr. Malíček, Ing. Vontorčík, the Managing Director of SPM, including Ing. Gidaszewski, head of the specialist mechanical section of SPM. The mechanical condition of the traction engine was very poor and required structural repairs. It is of importance to note that this engine was constructed using riveted connections with no seams. After a long search for a suitable partner to carry out the repairs, finally SES Tlmače was persuaded to take on the project. The following team was assigned to carry out the repairs: Ing. Seidl, Ing. Bielik, Ing. Majdik, Mr. Zajko and others. The repairs were completed on May 22, 1995 and that year the Traction engine was a star of the International Engineering Fair in Nitra. The final and most significant fact is that the repair cost was estimated at almost SKK 300,000, and this was paid by SES Tlmače as the sponsors of the project. We would like to thank them on behalf of all fans of vintage machines. Vladimír Majerčík
The Traction engine Umrath is part of the collection in the Slovak Agricultural Museum and was constructed in Prague in 1894. The weight of the traction engine is 3.5tonnes. The steam pressure is 7atmospheres which provides power to the drive wheels of 6 to 9hp, with a rotation speed of160rpm. For 8 hours of operation the coal consumption is approximately 200 kg and the water consumption 400 litres. We received information that the traction engine was still in existence, located above the village of Breznička from Ing. Čavoj in July 1985. On November 27, 1985 it was transported to the museum. After some research it was established that the Traction engine originally belonged to the “Lučenecký vlnársky závod v Opatovej pri Lučenci” – a wool processing company which was founded in 1868. Initially the Traction engine was used to drive pumps, but after World War I it was moved to the village of Breznička, where it was used to drive threshing machines and shredders. Given that it was a very rare traction engine, it awakened a tremendous desire in the museum staff to restore it. This was very strongly supported by: Dr. Križan, Mr. Boroth and his sons, Mr. Pilný, Mr. Malíček, Ing. Vontorčík, the Managing Director of SPM, including Ing. Gidaszewski, head of the specialist mechanical section of SPM. The mechanical condition of the traction engine was very poor and required structural repairs. It is of importance to note that this engine was constructed using riveted connections with no seams. After a long search for a suitable partner to carry out the repairs, finally SES Tlmače was persuaded to take on the project. The following team was assigned to carry out the repairs: Ing. Seidl, Ing. Bielik, Ing. Majdik, Mr. Zajko and others. The repairs were completed on May 22, 1995 and that year the Traction engine was a star of the International Engineering Fair in Nitra. The final and most significant fact is that the repair cost was estimated at almost SKK 300,000, and this was paid by SES Tlmače as the sponsors of the project. We would like to thank them on behalf of all fans of vintage machines. Vladimír Majerčík
The Traction engine Umrath is part of the collection in the Slovak Agricultural Museum and was constructed in Prague in 1894. The weight of the traction engine is 3.5tonnes. The steam pressure is 7atmospheres which provides power to the drive wheels of 6 to 9hp, with a rotation speed of160rpm. For 8 hours of operation the coal consumption is approximately 200 kg and the water consumption 400 litres. We received information that the traction engine was still in existence, located above the village of Breznička from Ing. Čavoj in July 1985. On November 27, 1985 it was transported to the museum. After some research it was established that the Traction engine originally belonged to the “Lučenecký vlnársky závod v Opatovej pri Lučenci” – a wool processing company which was founded in 1868. Initially the Traction engine was used to drive pumps, but after World War I it was moved to the village of Breznička, where it was used to drive threshing machines and shredders. Given that it was a very rare traction engine, it awakened a tremendous desire in the museum staff to restore it. This was very strongly supported by: Dr. Križan, Mr. Boroth and his sons, Mr. Pilný, Mr. Malíček, Ing. Vontorčík, the Managing Director of SPM, including Ing. Gidaszewski, head of the specialist mechanical section of SPM. The mechanical condition of the traction engine was very poor and required structural repairs. It is of importance to note that this engine was constructed using riveted connections with no seams. After a long search for a suitable partner to carry out the repairs, finally SES Tlmače was persuaded to take on the project. The following team was assigned to carry out the repairs: Ing. Seidl, Ing. Bielik, Ing. Majdik, Mr. Zajko and others. The repairs were completed on May 22, 1995 and that year the Traction engine was a star of the International Engineering Fair in Nitra. The final and most significant fact is that the repair cost was estimated at almost SKK 300,000, and this was paid by SES Tlmače as the sponsors of the project. We would like to thank them on behalf of all fans of vintage machines. Vladimír Majerčík
The Traction engine Umrath is part of the collection in the Slovak Agricultural Museum and was constructed in Prague in 1894. The weight of the traction engine is 3.5tonnes. The steam pressure is 7atmospheres which provides power to the drive wheels of 6 to 9hp, with a rotation speed of160rpm. For 8 hours of operation the coal consumption is approximately 200 kg and the water consumption 400 litres. We received information that the traction engine was still in existence, located above the village of Breznička from Ing. Čavoj in July 1985. On November 27, 1985 it was transported to the museum. After some research it was established that the Traction engine originally belonged to the “Lučenecký vlnársky závod v Opatovej pri Lučenci” – a wool processing company which was founded in 1868. Initially the Traction engine was used to drive pumps, but after World War I it was moved to the village of Breznička, where it was used to drive threshing machines and shredders. Given that it was a very rare traction engine, it awakened a tremendous desire in the museum staff to restore it. This was very strongly supported by: Dr. Križan, Mr. Boroth and his sons, Mr. Pilný, Mr. Malíček, Ing. Vontorčík, the Managing Director of SPM, including Ing. Gidaszewski, head of the specialist mechanical section of SPM. The mechanical condition of the traction engine was very poor and required structural repairs. It is of importance to note that this engine was constructed using riveted connections with no seams. After a long search for a suitable partner to carry out the repairs, finally SES Tlmače was persuaded to take on the project. The following team was assigned to carry out the repairs: Ing. Seidl, Ing. Bielik, Ing. Majdik, Mr. Zajko and others. The repairs were completed on May 22, 1995 and that year the Traction engine was a star of the International Engineering Fair in Nitra. The final and most significant fact is that the repair cost was estimated at almost SKK 300,000, and this was paid by SES Tlmače as the sponsors of the project. We would like to thank them on behalf of all fans of vintage machines. Vladimír Majerčík
At the beginning of the 1930s, the Czechoslovak State Railways (ČSD) ordered new high-performance locomotives from the Českomoravská- Kolben-Daněk company (ČKD), which should have provided transportation via semi-fast trains and express trains on mountain railways. ČKD created a new design No. 464 in 1933 with a two-cylinder superheated steam express tank engine and 2’D2’axle arrangement which was inspired by the successful 456.0 series by designer Vojtěch Kryšpín. The maximum speed of the twin-cylinder superheated steam locomotive peaked at 90 kph. First models did not have smoke deflectors; these were installed later. Thanks to the smoke deflectors, the locomotive gained its specific look and nickname “Ušatá” (“Blinker”). “Blinkers” started to operate in Slovakia from the depots in Vrútky and Zvolen no sooner than 1938. One locomotive from the series also dragged a funeral train of the first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, from Prague to Lány. The manufacturing facilities of ČKD Praha and Škoda Plzeň produced 76 steam locomotives in total. Due to their reliability and ease of use, the locomotives remained in operation until the end of steam locomotive operation in 1981. The 464.001 steam locomotive was taken over for the ČSD trial operation from ČKD Praha and assigned to the “Praha – Masarykovo nádraží” depot on November 2, 1933. The locomotive ended its service in the “Česká Lípa” depot in 1977. Thanks to the good operational condition and planned opening of the open-air railway museum in Česká Třebová, the locomotive was saved from being scrapped. Pursuant to the Donation Act from November 11, 1992, the locomotive was moved from the Považské Museum in Žilina to the Museum- Documentary Centre Bratislava of the Slovak Railway (MDC) as the only piece from the 464.0 series. From 1995 to 2007, a general overhaul and maintenance of the steam locomotive was conducted in order to get it to its operational state. As a technical monument of the Slovak Republic and an exhibit in deposit of the MDC in Bratislava, the 464.001 “Blinker” locomotive is currently entrusted in the care of the residents’ association Steam Engine Club in Prievidza (Prievidzský parostrojný spolok, o. z.). On its nostalgic railway journeys, the locomotive has carried several thousand passengers over six years. Only two locomotives of the 464 series have been preserved, the first model 464.001 and the last model 464.102 (maintained by the Czech Railways in the Lužná u Rakovníka Museum). Owing to expiration of the operational validity of the locomotive’s firebox in September 2013, the 464.001 “Blinker” steam locomotive has been undergoing demanding repairs (required by the law) again. Jana Oswaldová
At the beginning of the 1930s, the Czechoslovak State Railways (ČSD) ordered new high-performance locomotives from the Českomoravská- Kolben-Daněk company (ČKD), which should have provided transportation via semi-fast trains and express trains on mountain railways. ČKD created a new design No. 464 in 1933 with a two-cylinder superheated steam express tank engine and 2’D2’axle arrangement which was inspired by the successful 456.0 series by designer Vojtěch Kryšpín. The maximum speed of the twin-cylinder superheated steam locomotive peaked at 90 kph. First models did not have smoke deflectors; these were installed later. Thanks to the smoke deflectors, the locomotive gained its specific look and nickname “Ušatá” (“Blinker”). “Blinkers” started to operate in Slovakia from the depots in Vrútky and Zvolen no sooner than 1938. One locomotive from the series also dragged a funeral train of the first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, from Prague to Lány. The manufacturing facilities of ČKD Praha and Škoda Plzeň produced 76 steam locomotives in total. Due to their reliability and ease of use, the locomotives remained in operation until the end of steam locomotive operation in 1981. The 464.001 steam locomotive was taken over for the ČSD trial operation from ČKD Praha and assigned to the “Praha – Masarykovo nádraží” depot on November 2, 1933. The locomotive ended its service in the “Česká Lípa” depot in 1977. Thanks to the good operational condition and planned opening of the open-air railway museum in Česká Třebová, the locomotive was saved from being scrapped. Pursuant to the Donation Act from November 11, 1992, the locomotive was moved from the Považské Museum in Žilina to the Museum- Documentary Centre Bratislava of the Slovak Railway (MDC) as the only piece from the 464.0 series. From 1995 to 2007, a general overhaul and maintenance of the steam locomotive was conducted in order to get it to its operational state. As a technical monument of the Slovak Republic and an exhibit in deposit of the MDC in Bratislava, the 464.001 “Blinker” locomotive is currently entrusted in the care of the residents’ association Steam Engine Club in Prievidza (Prievidzský parostrojný spolok, o. z.). On its nostalgic railway journeys, the locomotive has carried several thousand passengers over six years. Only two locomotives of the 464 series have been preserved, the first model 464.001 and the last model 464.102 (maintained by the Czech Railways in the Lužná u Rakovníka Museum). Owing to expiration of the operational validity of the locomotive’s firebox in September 2013, the 464.001 “Blinker” steam locomotive has been undergoing demanding repairs (required by the law) again. Jana Oswaldová
At the beginning of the 1930s, the Czechoslovak State Railways (ČSD) ordered new high-performance locomotives from the Českomoravská- Kolben-Daněk company (ČKD), which should have provided transportation via semi-fast trains and express trains on mountain railways. ČKD created a new design No. 464 in 1933 with a two-cylinder superheated steam express tank engine and 2’D2’axle arrangement which was inspired by the successful 456.0 series by designer Vojtěch Kryšpín. The maximum speed of the twin-cylinder superheated steam locomotive peaked at 90 kph. First models did not have smoke deflectors; these were installed later. Thanks to the smoke deflectors, the locomotive gained its specific look and nickname “Ušatá” (“Blinker”). “Blinkers” started to operate in Slovakia from the depots in Vrútky and Zvolen no sooner than 1938. One locomotive from the series also dragged a funeral train of the first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, from Prague to Lány. The manufacturing facilities of ČKD Praha and Škoda Plzeň produced 76 steam locomotives in total. Due to their reliability and ease of use, the locomotives remained in operation until the end of steam locomotive operation in 1981. The 464.001 steam locomotive was taken over for the ČSD trial operation from ČKD Praha and assigned to the “Praha – Masarykovo nádraží” depot on November 2, 1933. The locomotive ended its service in the “Česká Lípa” depot in 1977. Thanks to the good operational condition and planned opening of the open-air railway museum in Česká Třebová, the locomotive was saved from being scrapped. Pursuant to the Donation Act from November 11, 1992, the locomotive was moved from the Považské Museum in Žilina to the Museum- Documentary Centre Bratislava of the Slovak Railway (MDC) as the only piece from the 464.0 series. From 1995 to 2007, a general overhaul and maintenance of the steam locomotive was conducted in order to get it to its operational state. As a technical monument of the Slovak Republic and an exhibit in deposit of the MDC in Bratislava, the 464.001 “Blinker” locomotive is currently entrusted in the care of the residents’ association Steam Engine Club in Prievidza (Prievidzský parostrojný spolok, o. z.). On its nostalgic railway journeys, the locomotive has carried several thousand passengers over six years. Only two locomotives of the 464 series have been preserved, the first model 464.001 and the last model 464.102 (maintained by the Czech Railways in the Lužná u Rakovníka Museum). Owing to expiration of the operational validity of the locomotive’s firebox in September 2013, the 464.001 “Blinker” steam locomotive has been undergoing demanding repairs (required by the law) again. Jana Oswaldová
At the beginning of the 1930s, the Czechoslovak State Railways (ČSD) ordered new high-performance locomotives from the Českomoravská- Kolben-Daněk company (ČKD), which should have provided transportation via semi-fast trains and express trains on mountain railways. ČKD created a new design No. 464 in 1933 with a two-cylinder superheated steam express tank engine and 2’D2’axle arrangement which was inspired by the successful 456.0 series by designer Vojtěch Kryšpín. The maximum speed of the twin-cylinder superheated steam locomotive peaked at 90 kph. First models did not have smoke deflectors; these were installed later. Thanks to the smoke deflectors, the locomotive gained its specific look and nickname “Ušatá” (“Blinker”). “Blinkers” started to operate in Slovakia from the depots in Vrútky and Zvolen no sooner than 1938. One locomotive from the series also dragged a funeral train of the first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, from Prague to Lány. The manufacturing facilities of ČKD Praha and Škoda Plzeň produced 76 steam locomotives in total. Due to their reliability and ease of use, the locomotives remained in operation until the end of steam locomotive operation in 1981. The 464.001 steam locomotive was taken over for the ČSD trial operation from ČKD Praha and assigned to the “Praha – Masarykovo nádraží” depot on November 2, 1933. The locomotive ended its service in the “Česká Lípa” depot in 1977. Thanks to the good operational condition and planned opening of the open-air railway museum in Česká Třebová, the locomotive was saved from being scrapped. Pursuant to the Donation Act from November 11, 1992, the locomotive was moved from the Považské Museum in Žilina to the Museum- Documentary Centre Bratislava of the Slovak Railway (MDC) as the only piece from the 464.0 series. From 1995 to 2007, a general overhaul and maintenance of the steam locomotive was conducted in order to get it to its operational state. As a technical monument of the Slovak Republic and an exhibit in deposit of the MDC in Bratislava, the 464.001 “Blinker” locomotive is currently entrusted in the care of the residents’ association Steam Engine Club in Prievidza (Prievidzský parostrojný spolok, o. z.). On its nostalgic railway journeys, the locomotive has carried several thousand passengers over six years. Only two locomotives of the 464 series have been preserved, the first model 464.001 and the last model 464.102 (maintained by the Czech Railways in the Lužná u Rakovníka Museum). Owing to expiration of the operational validity of the locomotive’s firebox in September 2013, the 464.001 “Blinker” steam locomotive has been undergoing demanding repairs (required by the law) again. Jana Oswaldová
At the beginning of the 1930s, the Czechoslovak State Railways (ČSD) ordered new high-performance locomotives from the Českomoravská- Kolben-Daněk company (ČKD), which should have provided transportation via semi-fast trains and express trains on mountain railways. ČKD created a new design No. 464 in 1933 with a two-cylinder superheated steam express tank engine and 2’D2’axle arrangement which was inspired by the successful 456.0 series by designer Vojtěch Kryšpín. The maximum speed of the twin-cylinder superheated steam locomotive peaked at 90 kph. First models did not have smoke deflectors; these were installed later. Thanks to the smoke deflectors, the locomotive gained its specific look and nickname “Ušatá” (“Blinker”). “Blinkers” started to operate in Slovakia from the depots in Vrútky and Zvolen no sooner than 1938. One locomotive from the series also dragged a funeral train of the first President of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, from Prague to Lány. The manufacturing facilities of ČKD Praha and Škoda Plzeň produced 76 steam locomotives in total. Due to their reliability and ease of use, the locomotives remained in operation until the end of steam locomotive operation in 1981. The 464.001 steam locomotive was taken over for the ČSD trial operation from ČKD Praha and assigned to the “Praha – Masarykovo nádraží” depot on November 2, 1933. The locomotive ended its service in the “Česká Lípa” depot in 1977. Thanks to the good operational condition and planned opening of the open-air railway museum in Česká Třebová, the locomotive was saved from being scrapped. Pursuant to the Donation Act from November 11, 1992, the locomotive was moved from the Považské Museum in Žilina to the Museum- Documentary Centre Bratislava of the Slovak Railway (MDC) as the only piece from the 464.0 series. From 1995 to 2007, a general overhaul and maintenance of the steam locomotive was conducted in order to get it to its operational state. As a technical monument of the Slovak Republic and an exhibit in deposit of the MDC in Bratislava, the 464.001 “Blinker” locomotive is currently entrusted in the care of the residents’ association Steam Engine Club in Prievidza (Prievidzský parostrojný spolok, o. z.). On its nostalgic railway journeys, the locomotive has carried several thousand passengers over six years. Only two locomotives of the 464 series have been preserved, the first model 464.001 and the last model 464.102 (maintained by the Czech Railways in the Lužná u Rakovníka Museum). Owing to expiration of the operational validity of the locomotive’s firebox in September 2013, the 464.001 “Blinker” steam locomotive has been undergoing demanding repairs (required by the law) again. Jana Oswaldová
After cancelling automobile production (1936), Zbrojovka (Brno) was looking for a supplementary civil programme. “Motorwheel”, a small motorcycle following the tradition of bicycle production, was considered. Ing. Josef Ullman was entrusted with the design. He finished the first prototype “Z 2” in 1939. However, it was actually a small motorcycle with a 98 cm3 engine. Further works were interrupted by the occupation; however Ing. Ullman was secretly carrying on with the project. The production of an enhanced version was ready by 1945. Ten prototypes were created in 1946 that successfully passed tests, and thus the motorcycle was included in the capacity range of Czechoslovakian motorcycles. Also the decision on its production in the Zbrojovka subsidiary plant, in Považská Bystrica (later Považské strojárne), was made in the same year. The production initiation was managed by Ing. Ullman and his co-operators, while further enhancements of volume reduction to 93 cm3 (Ø 32 × 58 mm) were carried out. Mass production of the motorcycle named MANET 90 (named after hill Manín) was initiated in 1947. It was the first Czechoslovakian post-war motorcycle, as well as the first mass produced motor vehicle in Slovakia. The motorcycle had a simple and attractive design, and thus was equipped with a double-piston single engine. This principle was based on the arrangement of two vertical working cylinders in a row, along with a shared combustion area (Garelli patent). Motorcycles with engines of this concept were produced by Puch company from 1926; however the most significant successes were recorded under DKW brand. The Maneta 90 engine had the power of 2.8 kW (3,5 k) upon 4500 revolutions per minute. Along with a three-stage gearbox, and multi-disc clutch working in the oil sump. Riding comfort was assured by the front-wheel telescopic fork, and suspended driver´s seat. The motorcycle’s load capacity was 80 kg upon the average consumption of 1.5 l/100 km. The maximum speed of this load capacity was 65 km/h. Manet 90 was greatly enjoyed from its beginnings, and it significantly contributed to motorisation of post-war Slovakia. 37630 machines left the production plant, until its production finished in 1951. However, very few pieces remain currently, which is why it is valued and sought-after by various motorcycle veterans. Miroslav Bachratý
After cancelling automobile production (1936), Zbrojovka (Brno) was looking for a supplementary civil programme. “Motorwheel”, a small motorcycle following the tradition of bicycle production, was considered. Ing. Josef Ullman was entrusted with the design. He finished the first prototype “Z 2” in 1939. However, it was actually a small motorcycle with a 98 cm3 engine. Further works were interrupted by the occupation; however Ing. Ullman was secretly carrying on with the project. The production of an enhanced version was ready by 1945. Ten prototypes were created in 1946 that successfully passed tests, and thus the motorcycle was included in the capacity range of Czechoslovakian motorcycles. Also the decision on its production in the Zbrojovka subsidiary plant, in Považská Bystrica (later Považské strojárne), was made in the same year. The production initiation was managed by Ing. Ullman and his co-operators, while further enhancements of volume reduction to 93 cm3 (Ø 32 × 58 mm) were carried out. Mass production of the motorcycle named MANET 90 (named after hill Manín) was initiated in 1947. It was the first Czechoslovakian post-war motorcycle, as well as the first mass produced motor vehicle in Slovakia. The motorcycle had a simple and attractive design, and thus was equipped with a double-piston single engine. This principle was based on the arrangement of two vertical working cylinders in a row, along with a shared combustion area (Garelli patent). Motorcycles with engines of this concept were produced by Puch company from 1926; however the most significant successes were recorded under DKW brand. The Maneta 90 engine had the power of 2.8 kW (3,5 k) upon 4500 revolutions per minute. Along with a three-stage gearbox, and multi-disc clutch working in the oil sump. Riding comfort was assured by the front-wheel telescopic fork, and suspended driver´s seat. The motorcycle’s load capacity was 80 kg upon the average consumption of 1.5 l/100 km. The maximum speed of this load capacity was 65 km/h. Manet 90 was greatly enjoyed from its beginnings, and it significantly contributed to motorisation of post-war Slovakia. 37630 machines left the production plant, until its production finished in 1951. However, very few pieces remain currently, which is why it is valued and sought-after by various motorcycle veterans. Miroslav Bachratý
After cancelling automobile production (1936), Zbrojovka (Brno) was looking for a supplementary civil programme. “Motorwheel”, a small motorcycle following the tradition of bicycle production, was considered. Ing. Josef Ullman was entrusted with the design. He finished the first prototype “Z 2” in 1939. However, it was actually a small motorcycle with a 98 cm3 engine. Further works were interrupted by the occupation; however Ing. Ullman was secretly carrying on with the project. The production of an enhanced version was ready by 1945. Ten prototypes were created in 1946 that successfully passed tests, and thus the motorcycle was included in the capacity range of Czechoslovakian motorcycles. Also the decision on its production in the Zbrojovka subsidiary plant, in Považská Bystrica (later Považské strojárne), was made in the same year. The production initiation was managed by Ing. Ullman and his co-operators, while further enhancements of volume reduction to 93 cm3 (Ø 32 × 58 mm) were carried out. Mass production of the motorcycle named MANET 90 (named after hill Manín) was initiated in 1947. It was the first Czechoslovakian post-war motorcycle, as well as the first mass produced motor vehicle in Slovakia. The motorcycle had a simple and attractive design, and thus was equipped with a double-piston single engine. This principle was based on the arrangement of two vertical working cylinders in a row, along with a shared combustion area (Garelli patent). Motorcycles with engines of this concept were produced by Puch company from 1926; however the most significant successes were recorded under DKW brand. The Maneta 90 engine had the power of 2.8 kW (3,5 k) upon 4500 revolutions per minute. Along with a three-stage gearbox, and multi-disc clutch working in the oil sump. Riding comfort was assured by the front-wheel telescopic fork, and suspended driver´s seat. The motorcycle’s load capacity was 80 kg upon the average consumption of 1.5 l/100 km. The maximum speed of this load capacity was 65 km/h. Manet 90 was greatly enjoyed from its beginnings, and it significantly contributed to motorisation of post-war Slovakia. 37630 machines left the production plant, until its production finished in 1951. However, very few pieces remain currently, which is why it is valued and sought-after by various motorcycle veterans. Miroslav Bachratý
After cancelling automobile production (1936), Zbrojovka (Brno) was looking for a supplementary civil programme. “Motorwheel”, a small motorcycle following the tradition of bicycle production, was considered. Ing. Josef Ullman was entrusted with the design. He finished the first prototype “Z 2” in 1939. However, it was actually a small motorcycle with a 98 cm3 engine. Further works were interrupted by the occupation; however Ing. Ullman was secretly carrying on with the project. The production of an enhanced version was ready by 1945. Ten prototypes were created in 1946 that successfully passed tests, and thus the motorcycle was included in the capacity range of Czechoslovakian motorcycles. Also the decision on its production in the Zbrojovka subsidiary plant, in Považská Bystrica (later Považské strojárne), was made in the same year. The production initiation was managed by Ing. Ullman and his co-operators, while further enhancements of volume reduction to 93 cm3 (Ø 32 × 58 mm) were carried out. Mass production of the motorcycle named MANET 90 (named after hill Manín) was initiated in 1947. It was the first Czechoslovakian post-war motorcycle, as well as the first mass produced motor vehicle in Slovakia. The motorcycle had a simple and attractive design, and thus was equipped with a double-piston single engine. This principle was based on the arrangement of two vertical working cylinders in a row, along with a shared combustion area (Garelli patent). Motorcycles with engines of this concept were produced by Puch company from 1926; however the most significant successes were recorded under DKW brand. The Maneta 90 engine had the power of 2.8 kW (3,5 k) upon 4500 revolutions per minute. Along with a three-stage gearbox, and multi-disc clutch working in the oil sump. Riding comfort was assured by the front-wheel telescopic fork, and suspended driver´s seat. The motorcycle’s load capacity was 80 kg upon the average consumption of 1.5 l/100 km. The maximum speed of this load capacity was 65 km/h. Manet 90 was greatly enjoyed from its beginnings, and it significantly contributed to motorisation of post-war Slovakia. 37630 machines left the production plant, until its production finished in 1951. However, very few pieces remain currently, which is why it is valued and sought-after by various motorcycle veterans. Miroslav Bachratý
After cancelling automobile production (1936), Zbrojovka (Brno) was looking for a supplementary civil programme. “Motorwheel”, a small motorcycle following the tradition of bicycle production, was considered. Ing. Josef Ullman was entrusted with the design. He finished the first prototype “Z 2” in 1939. However, it was actually a small motorcycle with a 98 cm3 engine. Further works were interrupted by the occupation; however Ing. Ullman was secretly carrying on with the project. The production of an enhanced version was ready by 1945. Ten prototypes were created in 1946 that successfully passed tests, and thus the motorcycle was included in the capacity range of Czechoslovakian motorcycles. Also the decision on its production in the Zbrojovka subsidiary plant, in Považská Bystrica (later Považské strojárne), was made in the same year. The production initiation was managed by Ing. Ullman and his co-operators, while further enhancements of volume reduction to 93 cm3 (Ø 32 × 58 mm) were carried out. Mass production of the motorcycle named MANET 90 (named after hill Manín) was initiated in 1947. It was the first Czechoslovakian post-war motorcycle, as well as the first mass produced motor vehicle in Slovakia. The motorcycle had a simple and attractive design, and thus was equipped with a double-piston single engine. This principle was based on the arrangement of two vertical working cylinders in a row, along with a shared combustion area (Garelli patent). Motorcycles with engines of this concept were produced by Puch company from 1926; however the most significant successes were recorded under DKW brand. The Maneta 90 engine had the power of 2.8 kW (3,5 k) upon 4500 revolutions per minute. Along with a three-stage gearbox, and multi-disc clutch working in the oil sump. Riding comfort was assured by the front-wheel telescopic fork, and suspended driver´s seat. The motorcycle’s load capacity was 80 kg upon the average consumption of 1.5 l/100 km. The maximum speed of this load capacity was 65 km/h. Manet 90 was greatly enjoyed from its beginnings, and it significantly contributed to motorisation of post-war Slovakia. 37630 machines left the production plant, until its production finished in 1951. However, very few pieces remain currently, which is why it is valued and sought-after by various motorcycle veterans. Miroslav Bachratý
The prime of postal vehicle transportation in interwar Czechoslovakia took place in the 1920s. At the beginning a fleet of the new autonomous republic consisted also of vehicles gained from the stock of the defeated Austro-Hungarian army. Since May 1919, likewise some bus lines from Austro-Hungarian era were put into operation and new ones meeting economic and public needs of the young state originated gradually. A number of postal vehicles increased and transport routes were prolonged. In 1927, Czechoslovak postal vehicle transportation covered 326 vehicles and 2,650 km of routes, which was approximately ten times more than in 1919. Such a positive development was possible predominantly thanks to the reorganisation of postal transportation. In January 1925, Administrative Office of Postal Vehicle Transportation was established and postal transportation offices which secured directly the operation of postal vehicle transportation were founded according to requirements. The motor fleet consisted almost exclusively of products of domestic automotive industry, mainly brands Praga and Laurin & Klement (or more precisely Škoda because since 1925 the automobile plant was taken over by a concern from Plzeň). The bus depicted on the postage stamp was manufactured with chassis of Škoda 125 and four-stroke petrol water-cooled four-cylinder engine with capacity of 1,944 cm3 and power of 30 hp. The engine was placed behind the front axle and vehicle transmission consisted of four speeds. The top speed of the bus was 60 km per hour and the fuel consumption ranged from 10 to 15 litres of petrol per 100 km. The bus bodywork was manufactured in a well-known company Sodomka in Vysoké Mýto. Sodomka included bus manufacturing into its programme in 1928 and the very first bus manufactured in this company was produced just with chassis of Škoda 125. Until 1933, the company manufactured approximately 35 buses in various modifications, for instance: a fire bus or excursion bus with open roof for spa town guests. A postman wearing a period postal uniform with a leaving bus Škoda 125 in the background is depicted on FDC. Leo Lichvár
The prime of postal vehicle transportation in interwar Czechoslovakia took place in the 1920s. At the beginning a fleet of the new autonomous republic consisted also of vehicles gained from the stock of the defeated Austro-Hungarian army. Since May 1919, likewise some bus lines from Austro-Hungarian era were put into operation and new ones meeting economic and public needs of the young state originated gradually. A number of postal vehicles increased and transport routes were prolonged. In 1927, Czechoslovak postal vehicle transportation covered 326 vehicles and 2,650 km of routes, which was approximately ten times more than in 1919. Such a positive development was possible predominantly thanks to the reorganisation of postal transportation. In January 1925, Administrative Office of Postal Vehicle Transportation was established and postal transportation offices which secured directly the operation of postal vehicle transportation were founded according to requirements. The motor fleet consisted almost exclusively of products of domestic automotive industry, mainly brands Praga and Laurin & Klement (or more precisely Škoda because since 1925 the automobile plant was taken over by a concern from Plzeň). The bus depicted on the postage stamp was manufactured with chassis of Škoda 125 and four-stroke petrol water-cooled four-cylinder engine with capacity of 1,944 cm3 and power of 30 hp. The engine was placed behind the front axle and vehicle transmission consisted of four speeds. The top speed of the bus was 60 km per hour and the fuel consumption ranged from 10 to 15 litres of petrol per 100 km. The bus bodywork was manufactured in a well-known company Sodomka in Vysoké Mýto. Sodomka included bus manufacturing into its programme in 1928 and the very first bus manufactured in this company was produced just with chassis of Škoda 125. Until 1933, the company manufactured approximately 35 buses in various modifications, for instance: a fire bus or excursion bus with open roof for spa town guests. A postman wearing a period postal uniform with a leaving bus Škoda 125 in the background is depicted on FDC. Leo Lichvár
The prime of postal vehicle transportation in interwar Czechoslovakia took place in the 1920s. At the beginning a fleet of the new autonomous republic consisted also of vehicles gained from the stock of the defeated Austro-Hungarian army. Since May 1919, likewise some bus lines from Austro-Hungarian era were put into operation and new ones meeting economic and public needs of the young state originated gradually. A number of postal vehicles increased and transport routes were prolonged. In 1927, Czechoslovak postal vehicle transportation covered 326 vehicles and 2,650 km of routes, which was approximately ten times more than in 1919. Such a positive development was possible predominantly thanks to the reorganisation of postal transportation. In January 1925, Administrative Office of Postal Vehicle Transportation was established and postal transportation offices which secured directly the operation of postal vehicle transportation were founded according to requirements. The motor fleet consisted almost exclusively of products of domestic automotive industry, mainly brands Praga and Laurin & Klement (or more precisely Škoda because since 1925 the automobile plant was taken over by a concern from Plzeň). The bus depicted on the postage stamp was manufactured with chassis of Škoda 125 and four-stroke petrol water-cooled four-cylinder engine with capacity of 1,944 cm3 and power of 30 hp. The engine was placed behind the front axle and vehicle transmission consisted of four speeds. The top speed of the bus was 60 km per hour and the fuel consumption ranged from 10 to 15 litres of petrol per 100 km. The bus bodywork was manufactured in a well-known company Sodomka in Vysoké Mýto. Sodomka included bus manufacturing into its programme in 1928 and the very first bus manufactured in this company was produced just with chassis of Škoda 125. Until 1933, the company manufactured approximately 35 buses in various modifications, for instance: a fire bus or excursion bus with open roof for spa town guests. A postman wearing a period postal uniform with a leaving bus Škoda 125 in the background is depicted on FDC. Leo Lichvár
The prime of postal vehicle transportation in interwar Czechoslovakia took place in the 1920s. At the beginning a fleet of the new autonomous republic consisted also of vehicles gained from the stock of the defeated Austro-Hungarian army. Since May 1919, likewise some bus lines from Austro-Hungarian era were put into operation and new ones meeting economic and public needs of the young state originated gradually. A number of postal vehicles increased and transport routes were prolonged. In 1927, Czechoslovak postal vehicle transportation covered 326 vehicles and 2,650 km of routes, which was approximately ten times more than in 1919. Such a positive development was possible predominantly thanks to the reorganisation of postal transportation. In January 1925, Administrative Office of Postal Vehicle Transportation was established and postal transportation offices which secured directly the operation of postal vehicle transportation were founded according to requirements. The motor fleet consisted almost exclusively of products of domestic automotive industry, mainly brands Praga and Laurin & Klement (or more precisely Škoda because since 1925 the automobile plant was taken over by a concern from Plzeň). The bus depicted on the postage stamp was manufactured with chassis of Škoda 125 and four-stroke petrol water-cooled four-cylinder engine with capacity of 1,944 cm3 and power of 30 hp. The engine was placed behind the front axle and vehicle transmission consisted of four speeds. The top speed of the bus was 60 km per hour and the fuel consumption ranged from 10 to 15 litres of petrol per 100 km. The bus bodywork was manufactured in a well-known company Sodomka in Vysoké Mýto. Sodomka included bus manufacturing into its programme in 1928 and the very first bus manufactured in this company was produced just with chassis of Škoda 125. Until 1933, the company manufactured approximately 35 buses in various modifications, for instance: a fire bus or excursion bus with open roof for spa town guests. A postman wearing a period postal uniform with a leaving bus Škoda 125 in the background is depicted on FDC. Leo Lichvár
The prime of postal vehicle transportation in interwar Czechoslovakia took place in the 1920s. At the beginning a fleet of the new autonomous republic consisted also of vehicles gained from the stock of the defeated Austro-Hungarian army. Since May 1919, likewise some bus lines from Austro-Hungarian era were put into operation and new ones meeting economic and public needs of the young state originated gradually. A number of postal vehicles increased and transport routes were prolonged. In 1927, Czechoslovak postal vehicle transportation covered 326 vehicles and 2,650 km of routes, which was approximately ten times more than in 1919. Such a positive development was possible predominantly thanks to the reorganisation of postal transportation. In January 1925, Administrative Office of Postal Vehicle Transportation was established and postal transportation offices which secured directly the operation of postal vehicle transportation were founded according to requirements. The motor fleet consisted almost exclusively of products of domestic automotive industry, mainly brands Praga and Laurin & Klement (or more precisely Škoda because since 1925 the automobile plant was taken over by a concern from Plzeň). The bus depicted on the postage stamp was manufactured with chassis of Škoda 125 and four-stroke petrol water-cooled four-cylinder engine with capacity of 1,944 cm3 and power of 30 hp. The engine was placed behind the front axle and vehicle transmission consisted of four speeds. The top speed of the bus was 60 km per hour and the fuel consumption ranged from 10 to 15 litres of petrol per 100 km. The bus bodywork was manufactured in a well-known company Sodomka in Vysoké Mýto. Sodomka included bus manufacturing into its programme in 1928 and the very first bus manufactured in this company was produced just with chassis of Škoda 125. Until 1933, the company manufactured approximately 35 buses in various modifications, for instance: a fire bus or excursion bus with open roof for spa town guests. A postman wearing a period postal uniform with a leaving bus Škoda 125 in the background is depicted on FDC. Leo Lichvár
The Prague aviation factory Aero paradoxically entered the automobile industry in times when many – even renowned – automobile industries started to involuntarily drop out under the influence of the developing economic crisis. Looking for an alternative production program to overcome stagnation, the company management decided to bet on production of the popular small car ENKA by the engineer Břetislav Novotný, who under the name Aero 500 had already presented himself to the public at the Prague Motor Show of 1929. This small, simple, lovely and (thanks to a two-stroke engine) also highly dynamic vehicle quickly gained popularity not just among the public but also among numerous auto racers and travellers (B. Turek, F. A. Elstner, B. Holas, R. Navara), who undertook many races as well as travel expeditions to the most remote places on the planet. Even though the two + one-seat automobile gradually evolved into a four-seater, the one-cylinder changed to a two-cylinder and the engine volume was raised first to 662, then 750 and finally to 1 000 cm3, in the mid-1930s it could not keep pace with the requirements of increasingly demanding customers. During this time a sporty-tuned type Aero 30 was designed with a dynamic bodyshell with a characteristically long engine bonnet (therefore the nickname Czech Jaguar), powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine with the performance of 30 k, being transferred to the front wheels. In 1936, a more efficient type Aero 50 appeared with a two-litre engine , the performance of 50 k and a lovely four-seat bodyshell. Both models became objects of inspiration for a specialised bodywork company Sodomka, which created some particularly luxurious bodywork variations on their base. Aero automobiles were also popular in Slovakia for their simplicity, endurance as well as for their favourable price and they were regularly appearing and winning at various sporting events such as the Czechoslovak 1000 Miles between Prague and Bratislava in 1933 and 1934. Aero 30 and Aero 50 triumphed in their categories at the Slovak 500 kilometres in 1937 and 1938. Post-war attempts to recover the automobile tradition in the factory Aero was shattered in 1947; the swan song was forced production of small freight cars such as the Škoda 150. After finishing this production the national enterprise turned to aviation production only, which was transferred from Vysočany to Vodochody in 1953. Nowadays, Aeros belong to favourite collection objects of Slovak antique auto enthusiasts, who have preserved these automobiles as a part of our cultural, technical and historical heritage for the future. Miroslav Bachratý
The Prague aviation factory Aero paradoxically entered the automobile industry in times when many – even renowned – automobile industries started to involuntarily drop out under the influence of the developing economic crisis. Looking for an alternative production program to overcome stagnation, the company management decided to bet on production of the popular small car ENKA by the engineer Břetislav Novotný, who under the name Aero 500 had already presented himself to the public at the Prague Motor Show of 1929. This small, simple, lovely and (thanks to a two-stroke engine) also highly dynamic vehicle quickly gained popularity not just among the public but also among numerous auto racers and travellers (B. Turek, F. A. Elstner, B. Holas, R. Navara), who undertook many races as well as travel expeditions to the most remote places on the planet. Even though the two + one-seat automobile gradually evolved into a four-seater, the one-cylinder changed to a two-cylinder and the engine volume was raised first to 662, then 750 and finally to 1 000 cm3, in the mid-1930s it could not keep pace with the requirements of increasingly demanding customers. During this time a sporty-tuned type Aero 30 was designed with a dynamic bodyshell with a characteristically long engine bonnet (therefore the nickname Czech Jaguar), powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine with the performance of 30 k, being transferred to the front wheels. In 1936, a more efficient type Aero 50 appeared with a two-litre engine , the performance of 50 k and a lovely four-seat bodyshell. Both models became objects of inspiration for a specialised bodywork company Sodomka, which created some particularly luxurious bodywork variations on their base. Aero automobiles were also popular in Slovakia for their simplicity, endurance as well as for their favourable price and they were regularly appearing and winning at various sporting events such as the Czechoslovak 1000 Miles between Prague and Bratislava in 1933 and 1934. Aero 30 and Aero 50 triumphed in their categories at the Slovak 500 kilometres in 1937 and 1938. Post-war attempts to recover the automobile tradition in the factory Aero was shattered in 1947; the swan song was forced production of small freight cars such as the Škoda 150. After finishing this production the national enterprise turned to aviation production only, which was transferred from Vysočany to Vodochody in 1953. Nowadays, Aeros belong to favourite collection objects of Slovak antique auto enthusiasts, who have preserved these automobiles as a part of our cultural, technical and historical heritage for the future. Miroslav Bachratý
The Prague aviation factory Aero paradoxically entered the automobile industry in times when many – even renowned – automobile industries started to involuntarily drop out under the influence of the developing economic crisis. Looking for an alternative production program to overcome stagnation, the company management decided to bet on production of the popular small car ENKA by the engineer Břetislav Novotný, who under the name Aero 500 had already presented himself to the public at the Prague Motor Show of 1929. This small, simple, lovely and (thanks to a two-stroke engine) also highly dynamic vehicle quickly gained popularity not just among the public but also among numerous auto racers and travellers (B. Turek, F. A. Elstner, B. Holas, R. Navara), who undertook many races as well as travel expeditions to the most remote places on the planet. Even though the two + one-seat automobile gradually evolved into a four-seater, the one-cylinder changed to a two-cylinder and the engine volume was raised first to 662, then 750 and finally to 1 000 cm3, in the mid-1930s it could not keep pace with the requirements of increasingly demanding customers. During this time a sporty-tuned type Aero 30 was designed with a dynamic bodyshell with a characteristically long engine bonnet (therefore the nickname Czech Jaguar), powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine with the performance of 30 k, being transferred to the front wheels. In 1936, a more efficient type Aero 50 appeared with a two-litre engine , the performance of 50 k and a lovely four-seat bodyshell. Both models became objects of inspiration for a specialised bodywork company Sodomka, which created some particularly luxurious bodywork variations on their base. Aero automobiles were also popular in Slovakia for their simplicity, endurance as well as for their favourable price and they were regularly appearing and winning at various sporting events such as the Czechoslovak 1000 Miles between Prague and Bratislava in 1933 and 1934. Aero 30 and Aero 50 triumphed in their categories at the Slovak 500 kilometres in 1937 and 1938. Post-war attempts to recover the automobile tradition in the factory Aero was shattered in 1947; the swan song was forced production of small freight cars such as the Škoda 150. After finishing this production the national enterprise turned to aviation production only, which was transferred from Vysočany to Vodochody in 1953. Nowadays, Aeros belong to favourite collection objects of Slovak antique auto enthusiasts, who have preserved these automobiles as a part of our cultural, technical and historical heritage for the future. Miroslav Bachratý
The Prague aviation factory Aero paradoxically entered the automobile industry in times when many – even renowned – automobile industries started to involuntarily drop out under the influence of the developing economic crisis. Looking for an alternative production program to overcome stagnation, the company management decided to bet on production of the popular small car ENKA by the engineer Břetislav Novotný, who under the name Aero 500 had already presented himself to the public at the Prague Motor Show of 1929. This small, simple, lovely and (thanks to a two-stroke engine) also highly dynamic vehicle quickly gained popularity not just among the public but also among numerous auto racers and travellers (B. Turek, F. A. Elstner, B. Holas, R. Navara), who undertook many races as well as travel expeditions to the most remote places on the planet. Even though the two + one-seat automobile gradually evolved into a four-seater, the one-cylinder changed to a two-cylinder and the engine volume was raised first to 662, then 750 and finally to 1 000 cm3, in the mid-1930s it could not keep pace with the requirements of increasingly demanding customers. During this time a sporty-tuned type Aero 30 was designed with a dynamic bodyshell with a characteristically long engine bonnet (therefore the nickname Czech Jaguar), powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine with the performance of 30 k, being transferred to the front wheels. In 1936, a more efficient type Aero 50 appeared with a two-litre engine , the performance of 50 k and a lovely four-seat bodyshell. Both models became objects of inspiration for a specialised bodywork company Sodomka, which created some particularly luxurious bodywork variations on their base. Aero automobiles were also popular in Slovakia for their simplicity, endurance as well as for their favourable price and they were regularly appearing and winning at various sporting events such as the Czechoslovak 1000 Miles between Prague and Bratislava in 1933 and 1934. Aero 30 and Aero 50 triumphed in their categories at the Slovak 500 kilometres in 1937 and 1938. Post-war attempts to recover the automobile tradition in the factory Aero was shattered in 1947; the swan song was forced production of small freight cars such as the Škoda 150. After finishing this production the national enterprise turned to aviation production only, which was transferred from Vysočany to Vodochody in 1953. Nowadays, Aeros belong to favourite collection objects of Slovak antique auto enthusiasts, who have preserved these automobiles as a part of our cultural, technical and historical heritage for the future. Miroslav Bachratý
The Prague aviation factory Aero paradoxically entered the automobile industry in times when many – even renowned – automobile industries started to involuntarily drop out under the influence of the developing economic crisis. Looking for an alternative production program to overcome stagnation, the company management decided to bet on production of the popular small car ENKA by the engineer Břetislav Novotný, who under the name Aero 500 had already presented himself to the public at the Prague Motor Show of 1929. This small, simple, lovely and (thanks to a two-stroke engine) also highly dynamic vehicle quickly gained popularity not just among the public but also among numerous auto racers and travellers (B. Turek, F. A. Elstner, B. Holas, R. Navara), who undertook many races as well as travel expeditions to the most remote places on the planet. Even though the two + one-seat automobile gradually evolved into a four-seater, the one-cylinder changed to a two-cylinder and the engine volume was raised first to 662, then 750 and finally to 1 000 cm3, in the mid-1930s it could not keep pace with the requirements of increasingly demanding customers. During this time a sporty-tuned type Aero 30 was designed with a dynamic bodyshell with a characteristically long engine bonnet (therefore the nickname Czech Jaguar), powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine with the performance of 30 k, being transferred to the front wheels. In 1936, a more efficient type Aero 50 appeared with a two-litre engine , the performance of 50 k and a lovely four-seat bodyshell. Both models became objects of inspiration for a specialised bodywork company Sodomka, which created some particularly luxurious bodywork variations on their base. Aero automobiles were also popular in Slovakia for their simplicity, endurance as well as for their favourable price and they were regularly appearing and winning at various sporting events such as the Czechoslovak 1000 Miles between Prague and Bratislava in 1933 and 1934. Aero 30 and Aero 50 triumphed in their categories at the Slovak 500 kilometres in 1937 and 1938. Post-war attempts to recover the automobile tradition in the factory Aero was shattered in 1947; the swan song was forced production of small freight cars such as the Škoda 150. After finishing this production the national enterprise turned to aviation production only, which was transferred from Vysočany to Vodochody in 1953. Nowadays, Aeros belong to favourite collection objects of Slovak antique auto enthusiasts, who have preserved these automobiles as a part of our cultural, technical and historical heritage for the future. Miroslav Bachratý
The Prague aviation factory Aero paradoxically entered the automobile industry in times when many – even renowned – automobile industries started to involuntarily drop out under the influence of the developing economic crisis. Looking for an alternative production program to overcome stagnation, the company management decided to bet on production of the popular small car ENKA by the engineer Břetislav Novotný, who under the name Aero 500 had already presented himself to the public at the Prague Motor Show of 1929. This small, simple, lovely and (thanks to a two-stroke engine) also highly dynamic vehicle quickly gained popularity not just among the public but also among numerous auto racers and travellers (B. Turek, F. A. Elstner, B. Holas, R. Navara), who undertook many races as well as travel expeditions to the most remote places on the planet. Even though the two + one-seat automobile gradually evolved into a four-seater, the one-cylinder changed to a two-cylinder and the engine volume was raised first to 662, then 750 and finally to 1 000 cm3, in the mid-1930s it could not keep pace with the requirements of increasingly demanding customers. During this time a sporty-tuned type Aero 30 was designed with a dynamic bodyshell with a characteristically long engine bonnet (therefore the nickname Czech Jaguar), powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine with the performance of 30 k, being transferred to the front wheels. In 1936, a more efficient type Aero 50 appeared with a two-litre engine , the performance of 50 k and a lovely four-seat bodyshell. Both models became objects of inspiration for a specialised bodywork company Sodomka, which created some particularly luxurious bodywork variations on their base. Aero automobiles were also popular in Slovakia for their simplicity, endurance as well as for their favourable price and they were regularly appearing and winning at various sporting events such as the Czechoslovak 1000 Miles between Prague and Bratislava in 1933 and 1934. Aero 30 and Aero 50 triumphed in their categories at the Slovak 500 kilometres in 1937 and 1938. Post-war attempts to recover the automobile tradition in the factory Aero was shattered in 1947; the swan song was forced production of small freight cars such as the Škoda 150. After finishing this production the national enterprise turned to aviation production only, which was transferred from Vysočany to Vodochody in 1953. Nowadays, Aeros belong to favourite collection objects of Slovak antique auto enthusiasts, who have preserved these automobiles as a part of our cultural, technical and historical heritage for the future. Miroslav Bachratý
On 20 December 2007, the United Nations 62nd General Assembly proclaimed 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. The Resolution was submitted by Italy, Galileo Galilei’s home country. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is an initiative of the International Astronomical Union, UNESCO, and is also supported by Slovakia. IYA2009 celebrates the first astronomical use of the telescope by Galileo in 1609 - an event which had global implications. Now hundreds of telescopes both land- and space-based explore the universe 24 hours a day. Under the central theme ‘The Universe, Yours to Discover’ IYA2009 gives all nations the chance to participate in scientific discoveries and grandiose technical solutions. This year will highlight global cooperation for peaceful purposes - the search for our cosmic origin and the common heritage which connects all citizens of Earth. The coordinating body for the IYA2009 events in Slovakia will be is the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Tatranská Lomnica. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences on the Earth. It originated in the ancient Sumerian and Egyptian civilizations, which used cardinal points basic orientation and time measurement techniques as early as the 5th millennium BC. As a branch of science it has developed from the 16th century thanks to the works of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. The subject of study - celestial objects - is accessible to all, so astronomy may be regarded as an international science typical of close cooperation and effective specialisation by individual countries. Thanks to concentrated efforts in three specific fields - solar and Earth-Sun relations research; the exploration of comets, meteors and asteroids; and stellar and stellar systems research - Slovakia has a firm place in the international astronomical research community. Astronomical organisations in Slovakia can be divided into three categories: (1) Basic research – the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences; (2) Education – the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of Comenius University in Bratislava and the Faculty of Science of P. J. Šafárik University in Košice; and (3) Popularisation – the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo and other observatories and planetaria of self-governing regions, cities, and municipalities. Astronomy fans are associated in the Slovak Astronomical Society under the Slovak Academy of Science and Slovak Association of Amateur Astronomers. Ján Svoreň
On 20 December 2007, the United Nations 62nd General Assembly proclaimed 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. The Resolution was submitted by Italy, Galileo Galilei’s home country. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is an initiative of the International Astronomical Union, UNESCO, and is also supported by Slovakia. IYA2009 celebrates the first astronomical use of the telescope by Galileo in 1609 - an event which had global implications. Now hundreds of telescopes both land- and space-based explore the universe 24 hours a day. Under the central theme ‘The Universe, Yours to Discover’ IYA2009 gives all nations the chance to participate in scientific discoveries and grandiose technical solutions. This year will highlight global cooperation for peaceful purposes - the search for our cosmic origin and the common heritage which connects all citizens of Earth. The coordinating body for the IYA2009 events in Slovakia will be is the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Tatranská Lomnica. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences on the Earth. It originated in the ancient Sumerian and Egyptian civilizations, which used cardinal points basic orientation and time measurement techniques as early as the 5th millennium BC. As a branch of science it has developed from the 16th century thanks to the works of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. The subject of study - celestial objects - is accessible to all, so astronomy may be regarded as an international science typical of close cooperation and effective specialisation by individual countries. Thanks to concentrated efforts in three specific fields - solar and Earth-Sun relations research; the exploration of comets, meteors and asteroids; and stellar and stellar systems research - Slovakia has a firm place in the international astronomical research community. Astronomical organisations in Slovakia can be divided into three categories: (1) Basic research – the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences; (2) Education – the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of Comenius University in Bratislava and the Faculty of Science of P. J. Šafárik University in Košice; and (3) Popularisation – the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo and other observatories and planetaria of self-governing regions, cities, and municipalities. Astronomy fans are associated in the Slovak Astronomical Society under the Slovak Academy of Science and Slovak Association of Amateur Astronomers. Ján Svoreň
On 20 December 2007, the United Nations 62nd General Assembly proclaimed 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. The Resolution was submitted by Italy, Galileo Galilei’s home country. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is an initiative of the International Astronomical Union, UNESCO, and is also supported by Slovakia. IYA2009 celebrates the first astronomical use of the telescope by Galileo in 1609 - an event which had global implications. Now hundreds of telescopes both land- and space-based explore the universe 24 hours a day. Under the central theme ‘The Universe, Yours to Discover’ IYA2009 gives all nations the chance to participate in scientific discoveries and grandiose technical solutions. This year will highlight global cooperation for peaceful purposes - the search for our cosmic origin and the common heritage which connects all citizens of Earth. The coordinating body for the IYA2009 events in Slovakia will be is the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Tatranská Lomnica. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences on the Earth. It originated in the ancient Sumerian and Egyptian civilizations, which used cardinal points basic orientation and time measurement techniques as early as the 5th millennium BC. As a branch of science it has developed from the 16th century thanks to the works of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. The subject of study - celestial objects - is accessible to all, so astronomy may be regarded as an international science typical of close cooperation and effective specialisation by individual countries. Thanks to concentrated efforts in three specific fields - solar and Earth-Sun relations research; the exploration of comets, meteors and asteroids; and stellar and stellar systems research - Slovakia has a firm place in the international astronomical research community. Astronomical organisations in Slovakia can be divided into three categories: (1) Basic research – the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences; (2) Education – the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of Comenius University in Bratislava and the Faculty of Science of P. J. Šafárik University in Košice; and (3) Popularisation – the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo and other observatories and planetaria of self-governing regions, cities, and municipalities. Astronomy fans are associated in the Slovak Astronomical Society under the Slovak Academy of Science and Slovak Association of Amateur Astronomers. Ján Svoreň
On 20 December 2007, the United Nations 62nd General Assembly proclaimed 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. The Resolution was submitted by Italy, Galileo Galilei’s home country. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is an initiative of the International Astronomical Union, UNESCO, and is also supported by Slovakia. IYA2009 celebrates the first astronomical use of the telescope by Galileo in 1609 - an event which had global implications. Now hundreds of telescopes both land- and space-based explore the universe 24 hours a day. Under the central theme ‘The Universe, Yours to Discover’ IYA2009 gives all nations the chance to participate in scientific discoveries and grandiose technical solutions. This year will highlight global cooperation for peaceful purposes - the search for our cosmic origin and the common heritage which connects all citizens of Earth. The coordinating body for the IYA2009 events in Slovakia will be is the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Tatranská Lomnica. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences on the Earth. It originated in the ancient Sumerian and Egyptian civilizations, which used cardinal points basic orientation and time measurement techniques as early as the 5th millennium BC. As a branch of science it has developed from the 16th century thanks to the works of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. The subject of study - celestial objects - is accessible to all, so astronomy may be regarded as an international science typical of close cooperation and effective specialisation by individual countries. Thanks to concentrated efforts in three specific fields - solar and Earth-Sun relations research; the exploration of comets, meteors and asteroids; and stellar and stellar systems research - Slovakia has a firm place in the international astronomical research community. Astronomical organisations in Slovakia can be divided into three categories: (1) Basic research – the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences; (2) Education – the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of Comenius University in Bratislava and the Faculty of Science of P. J. Šafárik University in Košice; and (3) Popularisation – the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo and other observatories and planetaria of self-governing regions, cities, and municipalities. Astronomy fans are associated in the Slovak Astronomical Society under the Slovak Academy of Science and Slovak Association of Amateur Astronomers. Ján Svoreň
On 20 December 2007, the United Nations 62nd General Assembly proclaimed 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. The Resolution was submitted by Italy, Galileo Galilei’s home country. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is an initiative of the International Astronomical Union, UNESCO, and is also supported by Slovakia. IYA2009 celebrates the first astronomical use of the telescope by Galileo in 1609 - an event which had global implications. Now hundreds of telescopes both land- and space-based explore the universe 24 hours a day. Under the central theme ‘The Universe, Yours to Discover’ IYA2009 gives all nations the chance to participate in scientific discoveries and grandiose technical solutions. This year will highlight global cooperation for peaceful purposes - the search for our cosmic origin and the common heritage which connects all citizens of Earth. The coordinating body for the IYA2009 events in Slovakia will be is the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Tatranská Lomnica. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences on the Earth. It originated in the ancient Sumerian and Egyptian civilizations, which used cardinal points basic orientation and time measurement techniques as early as the 5th millennium BC. As a branch of science it has developed from the 16th century thanks to the works of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. The subject of study - celestial objects - is accessible to all, so astronomy may be regarded as an international science typical of close cooperation and effective specialisation by individual countries. Thanks to concentrated efforts in three specific fields - solar and Earth-Sun relations research; the exploration of comets, meteors and asteroids; and stellar and stellar systems research - Slovakia has a firm place in the international astronomical research community. Astronomical organisations in Slovakia can be divided into three categories: (1) Basic research – the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences; (2) Education – the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of Comenius University in Bratislava and the Faculty of Science of P. J. Šafárik University in Košice; and (3) Popularisation – the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo and other observatories and planetaria of self-governing regions, cities, and municipalities. Astronomy fans are associated in the Slovak Astronomical Society under the Slovak Academy of Science and Slovak Association of Amateur Astronomers. Ján Svoreň
postage stamp design Ján Mudroch (1985) pencil
book illustrations
Study of woman's nude (1980) pencil
Study of woman's nude (1980) , indian ink
Self portrait (1982) (15x15) pencil
Reader (1980) pencil
Two stories (1986) watercolour - illustration for "Two stories" by Dušan Dušek
Figures (19??) indian ink
Head (1980) indian ink
Border stone II. (1988) watercolour - illustration for the book "Border stone" by Rudolf Sloboda
Border stone III. (1988) watercolour - illustration for the book "Border stone" by Rudolf Sloboda
Border stone I. (1988) watercolour - illustration for the book "Border stone" by Rudolf Sloboda
Border stone IV. (1988) watercolour - illustration for the book "Border stone" by Rudolf Sloboda
Border stone V. (1988) watercolour - illustration for the book "Border stone" by Rudolf Sloboda
Portrait of J.Mudroch (1984) pencil
L.S. (1980) pencil
Study of woman's nude (1980) pencil
Study of woman's nude (1980) sanguine
Model (1980) charcoal
Grandfather I. (1979) (50x30) en face portrait, pencil
Grandfather II. (1979) (50x30) profle portrait, pencil
Study of woman's nude (1980) charcoal
Two stories (1986) watercolour - illustration for "Two stories" by Dušan Dušek
Coleoptera of Záhorie (1983) (20x30) colour etching
paintings
Between two octaves (2000) (120x100) acrylic
BMW female nude (2001) (200x140) acrylic
I give you a white flower (2001) (200x140) acrylic
Carnival (2001) (100x140) acrylic
Twins (2002) (200x150) acrylic
Concert (2003) (60x50) acrylic
Encounter (2003) (180x150) acrylic
Fancy cakes from a wedding (2004) (140x240) acrylic
Bentley (2005) (140x280) acrylic
Delahaye (2005) (200x160) acrylic
Landscapes (2005) (180x150) acrylic
Bath (2005) (90x70) acrylic
van-dals (2006) (80x80) acrylic
Hipogryf (2007) (120x100) acrylic
Animal (2007) (70x40) acrylic
Gorilla at golf (2008) (100x120) acrylic
Pandora (2008) (180x130) acrylic
Drive them away (2008) (120x100) acrylic
Acrobats (2009) (150x120) acrylic
Horse racing (2009) (150x120) acrylic
komm-position (2009) (6 x 25x25) acrylic
Cosmic touch (2009) (180x130) acrylic
Bentley (2010) (120x150) acrylic
I mail you (2010) (100x80) acrylic
Visitors (2010) (80x60) acrylic
I count on you (2010) (90x70) acrylic
Before wake up (2010) (120x100) acrylic
Two twenty-five year olds (2011) (80x60) acrylic
Accordionist (2011) (50x40) acrylic
Posture behind (2011) (120x100) acrylic
In a mirror (2011) (100x80) acrylic
Not even in a dream (2011) (100x120) acrylic
Masked (2012) (80x60) acrylic
diptich - kiss of two gorillas (2017) oil , 2x 120x200
at first sight (2017), acrylic, 100x80
paintings
Encounter (1988) (125x110) oil
Gorilla (1993) (120x100) acrylic
Girl - hitch hiker (1994) (120x100) acrylic
At the photographer (1994) (120x140) oil
Metamorphoses (1995) (140x120) oil
Windy (1996) (170x130) oil
Alfa Romeo (1996) (200x140) acrylic
Jail (1997) (120x135) acrylic
Little (and) big dipper (1998) (200x140) acrylic
Kittens (1999) (140x190) acrylic
mmm (1999) (140x190) acrylic
Visit (1999) (120x100) acrylic
ex libris
Sandra (1987) (10x10) colour etching
Intermittently cloudy (1987) (9x9) colour etching
Mirror (1989) (10x9) colour etching
Hot breath (1990) (15x12) colour etching
Merry-go-round (1990) (10x9) colour etching
Black cat (1991) (10x10) colour etching
Right diagnosis (1992) (16x12) colour etching
Letters (1992) (10x9) colour etching
Dance (1992) (13x10) colour etching
Wings (1993) (9x7) colour etching
Magician (1993) (20x15) colour etching
Touches (1996) (14x11) colour etching
Paťka has a papa (1996) (16x12) colour etching
Dream elephant (1996) (13x10) colour etching
Bird (1997) (13x11) colour etching
A trio (1997) (12x10) colour etching
Flight (1998) (9x7) colour etching
The muse III. (1998) (10x7) colour etching
Victory (1999) (13x10) colour etching
Kingdom (2000) (10x9) colour etching
Planet 2000 (1999) (12x12) litography
The mirror (2000) (10x7) colour etching
Eye (2000) (10x8) colour etching
Time (2000) (14x11) colour etching
Night birds (2001) (13x10) colour etching
Nymphs (2004) (15x12) colour etching
Eros (2007) (13x9) colour etching
Snake of the year (2009) (10x8) colour etching
a+e (2001) (10x8) colour etching
graphics
Last solo (2000) (90x70) lithography
Last solo blue (2000) (90x70) lithography
Down without (2001) (14x10) colour etching
Tenor singer (2001) (14x14) colour etching
Hommage to Satchmo (2003) (40x30) lithography
Shooter (2005) (15x15) colour etching
Harvest on the moon (2008) (30x20) colour etching
Blueberries (2011) (40x50) lithography
Tree (2011) (50x35) lithography
In a circle I. (2011) (24x21) lithography
In a circle II. (2011) (24x21) lithography
s.oko.l (2005) (30x20) combination of graphic art techniques
Boomerang (2007) (30x20) colour etching
Marilyn (2000) (21x16) colour etching
graphics
Garden A.B. (2000) (20x16) colour etching
Aero 30 (2010) (14x20) colour etching
Bugatti (1997) (22x30) colour etching
Prophecy (1998) (21x15) colour etching
A visit to the Queen (2000) (32x28) colour etching
BMW nude (1998) (30x20) colour etching
Small bones (2001) (15x15) colour etching
Raisins (2001) (14x10) colour etching
BMW 328 (2005) (17x10) colour etching
Test No.1 (2000) (32x28) colour etching
Before (1999) (21x15) colour etching
The touch of muse (1998) (17x10) colour etching
Relations II. (1997) (62x50) colour etching
Relations I. (1997) (62x50) colour etching
Škoda Popular (1997) (21x29) colour etching
Morgan (1997) (22x32) colour etching
MG (1997) (22x32) colour etching
Duesenberg (1997) (29x23) colour etching
Art-rose I. (1997) (62x50) colour etching
Clamping (1995) (20x14) colour etching
Crosses (1995) (62x50) colour etching
Player (1994) (20x14) colour etching
Pharaoh's well (1995) (14x10) colour etching
Dream (1993) (20x15) colour etching
Boomerang (1992) (16x10) colour etching
Conversation (1990) (20x14) colour etching
Messages I. (1989) (90x70) colour etching
Taming of woman (1998) (62x50) colour etching, aquatint, mezzotint
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